Monthly Archives: April 2014

More support and understanding needed for people wanting to try a no meds approach

Jean Davison

pills_medication I’m concerned about the medicalisation of life; over-prescribing and how sometimes normal difficult emotions are (mis)diagnosed as an illness requiring medication. I expressed this view on twitter and said how I think Dr Joanna Moncrieff does make some valid points. Immediately I was accused of pill shaming, lack of empathy and insulting people who suffer from real deep depression.

Here is the article in the Telegraphwhich triggered the twitter responses to me after the psychiatrist Dr Alex Langford had put up a link to a similar article – his blog about this topic ishere. The media is often insensitive in its choice of language. I can see why ‘happy pills’ would annoy some people. This wasn’t my choice of words so I won’t try to defend a phrase I don’t use. ‘Happy Pills’ or ‘antidepressants? Call them what you will. They didn’t make me happy and they…

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Commentary: ADHD and social disadvantage: an inconvenient truth? – a reflection on Russell et al. () and Larsson et al. () – Nigg – 2014 – Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry – Wiley Online Library

How much is ADHD a result of social deprivation? Perhaps more than we think…

Commentary: ADHD and social disadvantage: an inconvenient truth? – a reflection on Russell et al. (2014) and Larsson et al. (2104) – Nigg – 2014 – Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry – Wiley Online Library.

Opening minds stigma scale for health care providers (OMS-HC): examination of psychometric properties and responsiveness

Unfortunately, many mental health workers and other health workers stigmatise their clients, often without being aware of this process. The Canadian Mental Health Commission has funded a programme to address this with the funding of the Opening Minds project.

A full report and final version of the Opening Minds Scale is available here

With a report on the development of the scale here BMC Psychiatry | Abstract | Opening minds stigma scale for health care providers (OMS-HC): examination of psychometric properties and responsiveness.

Prenatal exposure to antidepressants and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: systematic review and meta-analysis | BMJ

Two articles relating to potential harms caused by SSRI antidepressants – this first, which is freely downloadable, to unborn children, the second to cardiac patients:

Prenatal exposure to antidepressants and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn: systematic review and meta-analysis | BMJ.

JAMA Network | JAMA Internal Medicine | Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use, Depression, and Long-Term Outcomes After an Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Prospective Cohort Study.

Publishing stings find predatory journals, shoddy peer review | Ars Technica

Science??? Who knew? I hope the sham articles published submitted to these journals will not be replicated.

Publishing stings find predatory journals, shoddy peer review | Ars Technica.

Got Your ACE Score? « ACEs Too High

The CDC’s Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACE Studyuncovered a stunning link between childhood trauma and the chronic diseases people develop as adults, as well as social and emotional problems.

Got Your ACE Score? « ACEs Too High.

Withdrawing From Psychiatric Drugs: What Psychiatrists Don’t Learn | Mad In America

Withdrawing From Psychiatric Drugs: What Psychiatrists Don’t Learn | Mad In America.

“I am a resident psychiatrist. Like other psychiatrists in training today, I learn a lot about psychotropic drugs: the putative mechanisms of action, the evidence base, the indications, cautions and contraindications, interactions, side effects, toxicity, and monitoring. We learn how to initiate different agents. We learn how to combine different psychotropic drugs, what is called ‘rational polypharmacy’. We even learn how to switch from one drug to another, what is called ‘cross-tapering’. What we do not learn is how to stop these drugs. What there is no guidance on is how to stop these drugs. What there is no evidence on is how to stop these drugs. Unsurprisingly then, we never seem to stop these drugs!”

Most helpful thing this voice-hearer heard: ‘The voices are real’ | MinnPost

Congratulations, Ron! Most helpful thing this voice-hearer heard: ‘The voices are real’ | MinnPost.

Patient knowledge and involvement in healthcare (Workshop, Lancaster, 12 May 2014) | Centre for Medical Humanities

Royal Institute of Philosophy Workshop – wish I was in the UK for this! Patient knowledge and involvement in healthcare (Workshop, Lancaster, 12 May 2014) | Centre for Medical Humanities.

Podcast – Jonathan M. Metzl, ‘The Protest Psychosis: Race, Stigma, and the Diagnosis of Schizophrenia’ | Centre for Medical Humanities

Podcast – Jonathan M. Metzl, ‘The Protest Psychosis: Race, Stigma, and the Diagnosis of Schizophrenia’ | Centre for Medical Humanities.

Abstract: Misperceptions that persons with schizophrenia are violent or dangerous lie at the heart of stigmatizations of the disease. My talk tells the story of how these modern-day American conceptualizations of schizophrenic patients as violent emerged during the civil-rights era of the 1950s-1970s in response to a larger set of conversations about race. I integrate institutional, professional, and cultural discourses in order to trace shifts in popular and medical understandings of schizophrenia from a disease of white docility to one of “Negro” hostility, and from a disease that was nurtured to one that was feared