Monthly Archives: October 2014

This month in voices: September 2014

This month in voices

There wasn’t a great quantity of research published in September, but the two papers I summarise below are hopefully helpful in showcasing how cognitive behavioural therapy is actually done for voice-hearing, and how researchers are looking at the role of altered neural connectivity in voice-hearing.

BostonBoston, USA. Wigand and colleagues examine if changes to the wiring in the brain that link the auditory areas in the left hemisphere to the auditory areas in the right hemisphere may play a role in causing voice-hearing.

CC auditory The corpus callosum (blue) extracted from the rest of the brain (side view, front of the brain on the left). The part which links the left and right auditory areas is show in orange (taken from Wigand et al).

Accessible summary: The corpus callosum is a bundle of white matter fibers (the brain’s signalling cables) which link the right and left hemispheres of the brain. This…

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Home – Hearing Voices Network USA

Help for people who understand that one key to recovery is understanding the meaning voices have in the context of lived experience, and that as suppressing voices  with medication only works for some, other ways, more ethical of working are crucial in modern mental health work.

Home – Hearing Voices Network USA.

Hearing voices does not mean you’re crazy, says activist

A fine example of recovery – and answers a question – what would you want to recover?

recovery network: Toronto

Kevin Healey, 50, who has lived with voices in his head for decades, is part of a growing, global movement of people who have learned to live with those voices. Healey speaks to psychiatric groups and runs a support group for others like himself.

 Aw, shucks!  that particular activist would be me: in a piece published today in Toronto Star.

The photo is of me in my favourite  spot at Alternative Grounds.

A big thanks to reporter Valerie Hauch and photographer Steve Russell!

the star

Hearing voices need not mean you’re crazy, says activist

A Toronto man has learned to live with the voices in his head and argues they have been a positive part of his life.
By:Valerie Hauch News reporter, Published on Sun Mar 31 2013Kevin Healey, 50, who has lived with voices in his head for decades, is part of a growing, global movement of people who have learned to live with those voices. Healey speaks to psychiatric groups and runs a support group for others like himself.

Kevin Healey hears voices in his head, talks to them, feels very well and doesn’t want medication, thank you very much.

“I’m good. I’m not on medication and I don’t need to see anyone in mental health,” says Healey, 50, an articulate man who likes to laugh and is at peace with the dozen voices he carries in his head — all of whom, he…

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Connecting to madness | Jim van Os | TEDxMaastricht – YouTube

Professor of Psychiatry (dissenting member of DSM-5 panel) explians why schizophrenia is not a disease. And certainly no genetic disease. And why the name schizophrenia is gone in ten years.

Connecting to madness | Jim van Os | TEDxMaastricht – YouTube.

‘The outlook for schizophrenia is better than we think – but is being sabotaged by Assembly-line Psychiatry’ Dr Robin Murray @RCPsych

Presentation by Dr Robin Murray at the Royal College of Psychiatrists, Faculty of General Adult Psychiatry

‘The outlook for schizophrenia is better than we think – but is being sabotaged by Assembly-line Psychiatry’ Dr Robin Murray @RCPsych.

Treating Prolonged Grief Disorder:  A Randomized Clinical Trial

At last – evidence that feelings are important as well as thoughts (CBT): “emotional processing of memories of the death is an important component to achieve optimal reductions in PGD severity. Facilitating emotional responses to the death may promote greater changes in appraisals about the loss, which are associated with symptom reduction.”

It’s not hard to understand that many psychotic reactions will require similar processing of unbearable affect

JAMA Network | JAMA Psychiatry | Treating Prolonged Grief Disorder:  A Randomized Clinical Trial.

How Cannabis Causes Paranoia: Using the Intravenous Administration of ∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to Identify Key Cognitive Mechanisms Leading to Paranoia

“… it was definitively demonstrated that the drug triggers paranoid thoughts in vulnerable individuals. The most likely mechanism of action causing paranoia was the generation of negative affect and anomalous experiences”

How Cannabis Causes Paranoia: Using the Intravenous Administration of ∆9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) to Identify Key Cognitive Mechanisms Leading to Paranoia.

20 years of cannabis research: what have we learned?

“Daily cannabis users double their risk of experiencing psychotic symptoms and disorders, especially if they have a personal or family history of psychosis, and if they start using cannabis in their mid-teen”

King’s College London – 20 years of cannabis research: what have we learned?.

Johnson & Johnson to Pay More Than $2.2 Billion to Resolve Criminal and Civil Investigations | OPA | Department of Justice

“to resolve criminal and civil liability” for “promotion for uses not approved as safe and effective… and payment of kickbacks to physicians and to the nation’s largest long-term care pharmacy provider.” This is the “largest health care fraud settlements in U.S. history, including criminal fines and forfeiture totaling $485 million and civil settlements with the federal government and states totaling $1.72 billion.”

Johnson & Johnson to Pay More Than $2.2 Billion to Resolve Criminal and Civil Investigations | OPA | Department of Justice.

NICE Guidelines for Bipolar Disorder- a Missed Opportunity | Mad In America

@JoannaMoncrieff, “…but NICE’s concept of bipolar disorder is likely to be stretched well beyond 1% of the population.”

“NICE defines manic and hypomanic episodes as lasting for a minimum of seven and four days respectively, but I have never seen anyone with classical bipolar disorder whose mania did not last for several weeks, and sometimes months”

NICE Guidelines for Bipolar Disorder- a Missed Opportunity | Mad In America.