Category Archives: Guidelines

Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement

“Our work suggests that specific brain structures tied to processes critical for learning and educational functioning (eg, sustained attention, planning, and cognitive flexibility) are vulnerable to the environmental circumstances of poverty, such as stress, limited stimulation, and nutrition.” Freely available….

Study finds some schizophrenics do well without long-term antipsychotics – Chicago Tribune

“Patients who go off antipsychotics may drop off the radar of medical professionals, who mostly focus on the sickest patients, researchers say. And, in an era of intense stigma, patients who are off antipsychotics and functioning well are unlikely to discuss their experiences openly.”

” by the fifth year of the study, the schizophrenia patients who were off antipsychotics for extended periods actually were doing better than the patients who were on antipsychotics — perhaps because they had been less ill to begin with.”

A structured learning resource for effective mental health peer work

Inner City Cadre Project (Sydney, Australia)

Funded by the Lord Mayor Clover Moore MP Salary Trust

A Community Project of St Vincent’s Inner City Health Service

The intention [here] is to provide a structured learning resource which will assist people to understand the requirements and skills for effective peer work.

Recovery from mental ill health is an individual experience which takes place in a broader social, political and historical context.

We are uniquely placed as peers to support people’s recovery in many different working environments. Peer workers support clients’ recovery not only through utilising their lived experience of mental ill health but drawing on the strategies they employed and skills they learned in the pursuit of health and wellbeing.

Peer workers bring their experience and skills not only to support and advocate for clients, but to collaborate and partner with clients and colleagues.

Mad studies brings a voice of sanity to psychiatry | Peter Beresford | Society | The Guardian

“Recovery” was meant to be the bright new idea of mental health policy. For many service users, however, it has become code for cutting support and trying to push people off benefits and into employment. The rhetoric of “user involvement” carries less conviction as the sector is reshaped more by a push to privatisation than by the appeal for parity of esteem with physical health policy….

Mad studies brings a voice of sanity to psychiatry | Peter Beresford | Society | The Guardian.

Australasian Psychiatry Feature on Psychotherapy –

Edwin Harari 2104 Ghost Busting: Re-introducing psychotherapy for the psychiatrist

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to provide a clinically relevant historical and conceptual overview of psychotherapy as an introduction to a forthcoming series of papers on specific models of psychotherapy. The author offers a selective review of some key ideas in the history and practice of psychotherapy.

Conclusion: The principles of psychotherapy should inform all psychiatric practice, including the doctor– patient relationship, multidisciplinary teams caring for patients with complex or ‘treatment resistant’ problems, and patients who are non-compliant with psychotropic medication.

Keywords: psychotherapy, doctor–patient relationship, treatment resistance, psychotherapy and medication

Australasian Psychiatry 2014, Vol 22(5) 433–436 © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav

Australasian Psychiatry – Signposts http://www.apy.sagepub.com DOI: 10.1177/1039856214546673

Ghost Busting: re-introducing psychotherapy for the psychiatrist

Edwin Harari Consultant Psychiatrist, St. Vincent’s Hospital Area Mental Health Service, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia

Psychotherapy (‘healing the mind’) is a particular type of interpersonal influence, wherein one person, acknowledged by society as possessing relevant skills (the psychotherapist) seeks to change the thoughts, feelings, attitudes, behaviours, relationships or personality of a suffering other (the patient):

If one posits that the relation between doctor and patient has been critically wounded, how are we to understand whether, and on what basis, that relationship may be reasserted ? AI Tauber

The pedagogy for engaging hidden values and divided selves is the moral building of the clinician as a full developed human being. A Kleinman

I do not favour the way Descartes ontologically screwed up a reasonable search for mind-brain docking during the past four centuries yielding life-denying monstrosities like radical behaviourism and an emotionless information processing cognitivism… J Panksepp

The possibility of intersubjective knowledge offers a welcome relief from a forced choice between pure subjectivity (Descartes) and true objectivity (Kant). EM Hundert

The outcome of the game is to convert what would otherwise be a nameless trauma into a loss. J Lear

As a general rule throughout Asia, the more patriarchal the society, the more the Buddha looks like a woman: the more egalitarian the society, the more the Buddha looks like a man. L Shlain

Psychotherapists, especially, appreciate [that]… this painful ambivalence is as old as the ice-age, a hallmark of Cro-Magnon man, torn between his craving for consolation and his fear of revenge. J Cawte

Each of the above quotations may serve as a conceptual signpost or creative condensation of the argument each of the authors’ advances in their respective texts which bear on the nature, subject matter and practice of psychotherapy.

Read more here

References
 Tauber AI. Confessions of a medicine man: an essay in popular philosophy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002, p.103.
 Kleinman A. The divided self, hidden values and moral sensibility in medicine. Lancet 2011; 377: 804–805.
 Panksepp J. The self and ‘its’ vicissitudes. Critique of commentaries. Neuropsychoanaly-sis 2002; 4: 50.
 Hundert EM. Philosophy, psychiatry and neuroscience. Three approaches to the mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990, p.297.
 Lear J. Happiness, death and the remainder of life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000, p.92.
 Shlain L. The alphabet versus the goddess. New York: Penguin, 1998, p.200.
 Cawte J. Aboriginal healing: psychotherapy in ancient society. Aust J Psychother 1988; 7: 14.
 Doidge N. The brain that changes itself. Melbourne: Scribe, 2007, p.216.
 Wolff HH. The therapeutic and developmental functions of psychotherapy. Br J Med Psychol 1971; 44: 117–130.
 Markowitz JC and Milrod BL. The importance of responding to negative affect in psycho-therapies. Am J Psychiatr 2011; 168: 124–128.
 Frank JD and Frank JB. Persuasion and healing: a comparative study of psychotherapy (3rd edition). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.
 Kernberg OF. Severe personality disorders: psychotherapeutic strategies. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1984.
 Gabbard G and Kay J. The fate of integrated treatment: whatever happened to the biopsychosocial psychiatrist? Am J Psychiatr 2001; 158: 1956–1963.

http://thestringer.com.au/deconstructing-schizophrenia-in-australian-aborigines-9049#.VHQ3_YE_7qB.
In places where an increase in the incidence of schizophrenia has been reported, these can be attributed mainly to substance abuse (eg Drug Induced Psychosis). However, there are additional explanations for psychosis differential diagnoses. The most important of these is stress, and especially complex or traumatic stress – presenting as depressive psychosis in both its unipolar and bipolar forms.

Emotional health in childhood ‘is the key to future happiness’ | Society | The Guardian

Proving the good economics of supporting vulnerable kids (never mind the morality of this…)
http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/nov/08/happiness-childhood-emotional-health-richard-layard

Why do psychiatric drugs have withdrawal syndromes?

 – Beyond Meds

Generally, prolonged withdrawal syndrome is not recognized by medicine. You will find very few doctors to diagnose it and still fewer to treat it. This is a collection of links that might help you educate yourself so that you can find more appropriate care when the time comes as well as hopefully avoiding falling ill at all.

Why do psychiatric drugs have withdrawal syndromes?

 – Beyond Meds.

psych drugs

Home – Hearing Voices Network USA

Help for people who understand that one key to recovery is understanding the meaning voices have in the context of lived experience, and that as suppressing voices  with medication only works for some, other ways, more ethical of working are crucial in modern mental health work.

Home – Hearing Voices Network USA.

NICE Guidelines for Bipolar Disorder- a Missed Opportunity | Mad In America

@JoannaMoncrieff, “…but NICE’s concept of bipolar disorder is likely to be stretched well beyond 1% of the population.”

“NICE defines manic and hypomanic episodes as lasting for a minimum of seven and four days respectively, but I have never seen anyone with classical bipolar disorder whose mania did not last for several weeks, and sometimes months”

NICE Guidelines for Bipolar Disorder- a Missed Opportunity | Mad In America.