Category Archives: Phenomenolgy

Association of Child Poverty, Brain Development, and Academic Achievement

“Our work suggests that specific brain structures tied to processes critical for learning and educational functioning (eg, sustained attention, planning, and cognitive flexibility) are vulnerable to the environmental circumstances of poverty, such as stress, limited stimulation, and nutrition.” Freely available….

BBC Radio 4 – Today, 11/03/2015, Woman with schizophrenia hears 13 voices in her head

BBC Radio 4 – Today, 11/03/2015, Woman with schizophrenia hears 13 voices in her head.

Rachel Waddingham is a training consultant and a trustee of the National Hearing Voices network – she was diagnosed with schizophrenia and lives with hearing 13 voices, without medication.

Voices in people’s heads are more varied and complex than previously thought, according to research by Durham and Stanford universities, published in The Lancet Psychiatry on 11 March.

▶ Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime – YouTube

▶ Nadine Burke Harris: How childhood trauma affects health across a lifetime – YouTube.

Childhood trauma isn’t something you just get over as you grow up. Pediatrician Nadine Burke Harris explains that the repeated stress of abuse, neglect and parents struggling with mental health or substance abuse issues has real, tangible effects on the development of the brain. This unfolds across a lifetime, to the point where those who’ve experienced high levels of trauma are at triple the risk for heart disease and lung cancer. An impassioned plea for pediatric medicine to confront the prevention and treatment of trauma, head-on.

Mad studies brings a voice of sanity to psychiatry | Peter Beresford | Society | The Guardian

“Recovery” was meant to be the bright new idea of mental health policy. For many service users, however, it has become code for cutting support and trying to push people off benefits and into employment. The rhetoric of “user involvement” carries less conviction as the sector is reshaped more by a push to privatisation than by the appeal for parity of esteem with physical health policy….

Mad studies brings a voice of sanity to psychiatry | Peter Beresford | Society | The Guardian.

The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Online First – Springer

In Rialto, police use-of-force was 2.5 times higher before the cameras were introduced.

The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizens’ Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial – Online First – Springer.

The Island Where People Forget to Die – NYTimes.com

The Island Where People Forget to Die – NYTimes.com.

“…their daily routine unfolded much the way Leriadis had described it: Wake naturally, work in the garden, have a late lunch, take a nap. At sunset, they either visited neighbors or neighbors visited them. Their diet was also typical: a breakfast of goat’s milk, wine, sage tea or coffee, honey and bread. Lunch was almost always beans (lentils, garbanzos), potatoes, greens (fennel, dandelion or a spinachlike green called horta) and whatever seasonal vegetables their garden produced; dinner was bread and goat’s milk. At Christmas and Easter, they would slaughter the family pig and enjoy small portions of larded pork for the next several months… “

Australasian Psychiatry Feature on Psychotherapy –

Edwin Harari 2104 Ghost Busting: Re-introducing psychotherapy for the psychiatrist

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to provide a clinically relevant historical and conceptual overview of psychotherapy as an introduction to a forthcoming series of papers on specific models of psychotherapy. The author offers a selective review of some key ideas in the history and practice of psychotherapy.

Conclusion: The principles of psychotherapy should inform all psychiatric practice, including the doctor– patient relationship, multidisciplinary teams caring for patients with complex or ‘treatment resistant’ problems, and patients who are non-compliant with psychotropic medication.

Keywords: psychotherapy, doctor–patient relationship, treatment resistance, psychotherapy and medication

Australasian Psychiatry 2014, Vol 22(5) 433–436 © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav

Australasian Psychiatry – Signposts http://www.apy.sagepub.com DOI: 10.1177/1039856214546673

Ghost Busting: re-introducing psychotherapy for the psychiatrist

Edwin Harari Consultant Psychiatrist, St. Vincent’s Hospital Area Mental Health Service, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia

Psychotherapy (‘healing the mind’) is a particular type of interpersonal influence, wherein one person, acknowledged by society as possessing relevant skills (the psychotherapist) seeks to change the thoughts, feelings, attitudes, behaviours, relationships or personality of a suffering other (the patient):

If one posits that the relation between doctor and patient has been critically wounded, how are we to understand whether, and on what basis, that relationship may be reasserted ? AI Tauber

The pedagogy for engaging hidden values and divided selves is the moral building of the clinician as a full developed human being. A Kleinman

I do not favour the way Descartes ontologically screwed up a reasonable search for mind-brain docking during the past four centuries yielding life-denying monstrosities like radical behaviourism and an emotionless information processing cognitivism… J Panksepp

The possibility of intersubjective knowledge offers a welcome relief from a forced choice between pure subjectivity (Descartes) and true objectivity (Kant). EM Hundert

The outcome of the game is to convert what would otherwise be a nameless trauma into a loss. J Lear

As a general rule throughout Asia, the more patriarchal the society, the more the Buddha looks like a woman: the more egalitarian the society, the more the Buddha looks like a man. L Shlain

Psychotherapists, especially, appreciate [that]… this painful ambivalence is as old as the ice-age, a hallmark of Cro-Magnon man, torn between his craving for consolation and his fear of revenge. J Cawte

Each of the above quotations may serve as a conceptual signpost or creative condensation of the argument each of the authors’ advances in their respective texts which bear on the nature, subject matter and practice of psychotherapy.

Read more here

References
 Tauber AI. Confessions of a medicine man: an essay in popular philosophy. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2002, p.103.
 Kleinman A. The divided self, hidden values and moral sensibility in medicine. Lancet 2011; 377: 804–805.
 Panksepp J. The self and ‘its’ vicissitudes. Critique of commentaries. Neuropsychoanaly-sis 2002; 4: 50.
 Hundert EM. Philosophy, psychiatry and neuroscience. Three approaches to the mind. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990, p.297.
 Lear J. Happiness, death and the remainder of life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2000, p.92.
 Shlain L. The alphabet versus the goddess. New York: Penguin, 1998, p.200.
 Cawte J. Aboriginal healing: psychotherapy in ancient society. Aust J Psychother 1988; 7: 14.
 Doidge N. The brain that changes itself. Melbourne: Scribe, 2007, p.216.
 Wolff HH. The therapeutic and developmental functions of psychotherapy. Br J Med Psychol 1971; 44: 117–130.
 Markowitz JC and Milrod BL. The importance of responding to negative affect in psycho-therapies. Am J Psychiatr 2011; 168: 124–128.
 Frank JD and Frank JB. Persuasion and healing: a comparative study of psychotherapy (3rd edition). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.
 Kernberg OF. Severe personality disorders: psychotherapeutic strategies. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1984.
 Gabbard G and Kay J. The fate of integrated treatment: whatever happened to the biopsychosocial psychiatrist? Am J Psychiatr 2001; 158: 1956–1963.

What’s normal? The politics of psychiatric labeling

What’s normal? The politics of psychiatric labeling

Being labeled ‘mentally ill’ can be an enormous burden: on individuals, their families, and their friends.  It’s a label that can hang like an albatross around someone’s neck, instead of serving as a guide to the most appropriate support.The evolution of the “Diagnostic and Statistical Manual” – the ‘bible’ of American psychiatry – is a classic illustration of this process at work…

Concepts of suffering and anguish have always varied across historical and cultural contexts, and they manifest in the body in many different ways. For example, the autism spectrum has variously positioned people as being intertwined with the spirit world and deserving of elevated status, or disabled to the point of requiring highly-specialized treatment for remediation…

Psychiatric concepts, methods of research and even data are not ‘givens.’ They are all embedded in social systems, and shaped by cultural, political and economic forces…

http://thestringer.com.au/deconstructing-schizophrenia-in-australian-aborigines-9049#.VHQ3_YE_7qB.
In places where an increase in the incidence of schizophrenia has been reported, these can be attributed mainly to substance abuse (eg Drug Induced Psychosis). However, there are additional explanations for psychosis differential diagnoses. The most important of these is stress, and especially complex or traumatic stress – presenting as depressive psychosis in both its unipolar and bipolar forms.

INTERVOICE Networks and Groups

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Hearing Voices groups are places for people to explore the meaning of their voices not as products of a diseased brain.  http://v.gd/304XlC